Here’s how many Facebook users are less likely to be deleted?

A leaked document detailing Facebook’s ratings system for people whose posts have been ‘deleted’ by the social network has shown a clear eye-for-an-eye attitude toward its big data and public policy issues. The document,…

Here's how many Facebook users are less likely to be deleted?

A leaked document detailing Facebook’s ratings system for people whose posts have been ‘deleted’ by the social network has shown a clear eye-for-an-eye attitude toward its big data and public policy issues.

The document, which was dated to May 2nd, details the company’s decisions to restore posts by many users.

And a handful of questions specifically focused on who would be most likely to be too angry to have a post marked ‘deleted,’ as users can delete posts and symbols if they are ‘disappointed’, or ‘surprised’ that they were deleted.

Those two, appearing on the list of ‘tests’, were to:

Remove Facebook posts if someone is upset at something someone else has posted on Facebook.

Provide more context by explaining what will change and how.

Among the 23 ‘tests’ detailed in the document, we can see exactly how many Facebook users could be so upset and disrespected that they would want their posts ‘deleted’ for good.

There are 64 Facebook pages/instructions for deactivating your account. Eight of those were affected by each test.

There were also 632 individual Facebook pages affected by each test.

And there were 11 Facebook Messenger accounts affected by each test.

Again, we can see where Facebook was focusing on when deciding whether or not to restore posts, based on the test.

If you would be more likely to feel upset by the actions of your social network if they were deleted:

It was negative posts; approximately 43% of test group

Positive posts; approximately 48% of test group

Okay, thanks to the leaked document Facebook public policy would need to determine whether a post was positive or negative.

And it’s not just about the keywords on the page, it also looks at whether or not the person posting is on Facebook or it is an app and how long it’s been up for, as well as other information about the person in question.

And, Facebook now has to deal with an in-depth questionnaire, asking questions including:

What is your name?

What is your relationship status?

How did you get on Facebook?

How often do you use Facebook?

Which social networks are you on at the moment?

Which apps do you use at the moment?

What device do you use at the moment?

Are you interested in music?

Do you like watching video on Facebook?

Is there anything you would like to say to your friends?

Please address your answers to your friends’ names, specifically your ‘friends’.

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